Leading CIOs know the importance of aligning themselves to business goals such as Digital Transformation initiatives. This alignment is only possible with a detailed understanding of all technology consumption, especially Software as a Service (SaaS) and other cloud technologies.

As software vendors and organizations transition from traditional license models to SaaS, the risk of higher outlays on software has grown significantly. Individual business units are purchasing their own SaaS instances, which can drive over-provisioning of user accounts, excessive account entitlement and expensive overuse of virtual environments.

In this complimentary paper Gartner analysts Stephen White and Victoria Barber note: “By 2020, for 40% of software titles, the fundamental priority of software asset management (SAM) will shift from managing compliance with software publisher terms and conditions to eliminating unnecessary expenditure in "as a service" contracts.”1

We feel that the paper highlights the critical role Software Asset Management plays in containing SaaS application costs.


1 Software Asset Management Reaches a Tipping Point: SaaS Cost Management Eclipses License Compliance. Stephen White and Victoria Barber. January 6, 2017.

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View the full report:

Article 1

Today's workers use smartphones, tables and laptops from wherever they are - at home, on the move or in the office. Users are more flexible in the jobs they undertake - often crossing job roles and thus requiring software that pevious generations would never have touched. But how is it possible to balance these growing user demands and at the same tiem ensure the company is not exposed to license liability?

Article 2

Today's workers use smartphones, tables and laptops from wherever they are - at home, on the move or in the office. Users are more flexible in the jobs they undertake - often crossing job roles and thus requiring software that pevious generations would never have touched. But how is it possible to balance these growing user demands and at the same tiem ensure the company is not exposed to license liability?

Article 3

Today's workers use smartphones, tables and laptops from wherever they are - at home, on the move or in the office. Users are more flexible in the jobs they undertake - often crossing job roles and thus requiring software that pevious generations would never have touched. But how is it possible to balance these growing user demands and at the same tiem ensure the company is not exposed to license liability?

Article 4

Today's workers use smartphones, tables and laptops from wherever they are - at home, on the move or in the office. Users are more flexible in the jobs they undertake - often crossing job roles and thus requiring software that pevious generations would never have touched. But how is it possible to balance these growing user demands and at the same tiem ensure the company is not exposed to license liability?

Article 5

Today's workers use smartphones, tables and laptops from wherever they are - at home, on the move or in the office. Users are more flexible in the jobs they undertake - often crossing job roles and thus requiring software that pevious generations would never have touched. But how is it possible to balance these growing user demands and at the same tiem ensure the company is not exposed to license liability?

Article 6

Today's workers use smartphones, tables and laptops from wherever they are - at home, on the move or in the office. Users are more flexible in the jobs they undertake - often crossing job roles and thus requiring software that pevious generations would never have touched. But how is it possible to balance these growing user demands and at the same tiem ensure the company is not exposed to license liability?

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